The Economic Burden of Autism

Families with an autistic child or children know all too well the financial strain of paying medical bills. According to a new study from the University of Pennsylvania and the London School of Economics and Political Science, the lifetime cost of being diagnosed with autism in the United States is anywhere between $1.43 million and $2.44 million. These costs are mostly from residential care, early intervention treatments, special education, and small chances of employment/lack of employment opportunities. The researchers included people who were over the age of 18 to acknowledge the price of a potential lifelong disability.

Over 3.5 million Americans in the U.S are estimated to have autism, according to the Center for Disease Control. And when we assume that about 40% of them are intellectually disabled, the total cost of autism in the U.S comes to about $236 billion per year. The national cost of supporting children with autism is estimated to be between $61 and $66 billion a year, for adults that cost came up to between $175 and $196 billion a year.

The largest costs for children were the special education costs and parental productivity costs, whereas the largest costs for adults on the spectrum were residential care/supportive living accommodations, and individual productivity lost. In other words, parents tend to cut back on their work hours or quit their job to care for their autistic child and then once their child reaches adulthood, they have limited earning potentials. 

According to a pair of experts from the A.J Drexel Autism Institute at Drexel University in Philadelphia we need to start thinking differently about these very large costs. Instead of there being “costs to help needy people” we should rather be focused on the issue as “investments in building stronger communities.”

Paul Shattuck, an associate professor at Drexel argues that more studies of adults and young adults with autism are needed as well as better employment practices to engage the autistic community. At the end of the day it will cost us more if decide to not care about those on the spectrum.

​For the original study, click here.

​ICare4Autism will be addressing many issues that autism families and young adults face as well as looking forward to new research and roads to opportunity. To get more information, click HERE!