Study Supports Personalized Interventions & Tablet Use

Researchers at UCLA found that children with autism who face bigger challenges when it comes to speaking and communicating can actually develop those skills through personalized interventions and the use of tablets and apps. The study spanned over three years and looked at 61 children on the spectrum ages 5 to 8.  About 30 percent of children on the spectrum do remain non-verbal or minimally verbal even after years of intervention.

For the study, each child received communication therapy that focused specifically on social communication gestures as well as play skills and verbal communication, for six months. Then half of the children were randomly selected to use speech-generating apps for the majority of their session time. Therapists would work on communication therapy with the child and also use the apps where, for example, a child could tap a picture and the audio of the name of the picture would play. They found that using the apps during therapy was more effective that communication intervention alone. Children who had access to the tablets and learning apps were more likely to use language spontaneously and socially. 

Connie Kasari, professor of human development and psychology at the UCLA Grad School of Education and professor of psychiatry at UCLA’s Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior and senior author of the study, says “It was remarkable how well the tablet worked in providing access to communication for these children. Children who received the behavioral intervention along with the tablet to support their communication attempts made such faster progress in learning to communicate, and especially in using spoken language.”

The researcher also followed up with the children three months after the initial study and found that their improvements were consistent during that time. This was the first study that used multiple assessments and catered the interventions to according how each child responded.

This past ICare4Autism International Autism Conference highlighted ways in which technology could be beneficial for those on the spectrum. To see the slides for some of the speakers, click HERE.