Scientists Come Closer to Understanding Autism

(Source: http://scitechdaily.com/study-shows-oxytocin-improves-brain-function-children-autism/)

A recent study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences has discovered that oxytocin levels in children actually have nothing to with the onset of autism. Oxytocin is the hormone responsible for our feelings of attachment and closeness that help us in bonding and socializing with others. A Stanford researcher, Karen Parker, who led the study, along with her team studied 200 children that included autistic children, their siblings, and non-autistic children. As many theories claimed, Parker’s hypothesis was also that “the kids with autism would have the lowest oxytocin levels, the siblings would be intermediate, and the neurotypical controls would be the highest. That clearly wasn’t the case.”

This oxytocin deficit theory was popular because of the socialization difficulties many children with autism face. There have also been a few studies where giving people with autism a boost in oxytocin could help their social functioning. Oxytocin is produced in the hypothalamus and affects not only the brain, but also the body.

Parker’s study found that there was actually a high genetic influence on a child’s oxytocin levels. So if their parents had low levels of oxytocin then their children also appeared to have low levels as well. These different levels of hormone affected the social functioning of kids with autism and without autism the same way, “As your oxytocin levels got higher, your social functioning was more enhanced,” Parker explains.

However, there are still many parts of the story left to discover when it comes to oxytocin role and its potential benefits for those on the spectrum. Despite the fact that it is not actually a cause for autism, it can provide answers to questions such as why some autistic children have responded to oxytocin treatments and others do not. Regardless, there is promising research ahead for researchers studying this influential hormone. 

​Dr. Eric Hollander, Clinical Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and Director of the Autism & Obsessive Compulsive Spectrum Program at Albert Einstein College of Medicine and Montefiore Medical Center, Director of the Spectrum Neuroscience and Treatment Institute and also Chairman of the ICare4Autism Advisory Council, dedicates part of his research to studying the ways that oxytocin can benefit children on the spectrum ​and the role this hormone plays in social attachment and repetitive behaviors. So far, Dr. Hollander and his team have had positive results in manipulating oxytocin levels for the benefit of people on the spectrum and are still conducting research in order to create treatments and best practices. Dr. Hollander recently gave a presentation on Oxytocin at this past ICare4Autism Conference, click HERE to read more.