Nutritional Therapy for Parents

Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are developmental disorders that affect children by disrupting their ability to communicate and interact socially. To reduce a child’s symptoms of autism and improve social and cognitive behaviors in speech, parents can try nutritional therapy. This is because many children with ASD have reported to have allergies and high sensitivity to foods, especially gluten and casein. Children with autism, according to the theory, process peptides and proteins in foods containing gluten and casein differently than other people do and this difference in processing may exacerbate autistic symptoms.

Identify those food allergies as soon as possible can be vital to the developmental progress of a child with ASD.  Gluten (found in wheat, barley and rye) and casein (found in milk and dairy products), are important in caring for an Autistic child and is worth trying out as many parents have reported changes in speech and behavior after utilizing nutritional therapy.  Parents can seek allergy testing for confirmation or keep a food diary, and remove certain foods from your diet, to determine exactly what your child is allergic to.

Before going to the grocery store, you can make a list of what your child can have.  You can give pictures of foods the child can eat and have them participate in choosing the foods they would like to eat, that way the child gets a choice but the choice is within a list of acceptable food.

You can have the child with ASD help you cross items off the list while shopping with you. Or you can say the name of the item, point to the item, have the child hold the item or put into the basket so the child starts expanding their vocabulary via sight and sound. You can describe color of the apple, the texture as child holds item, is it a hard or soft object. You can make it a game where she has to help you find what’s next on the list, help you grab it off the shelf, and help you count how many items are left on the list.  Every moment can be a teachable moment that you can do with the child, and even thought at first it seem they aren’t getting it, keep trying, like all children they need lots of repetition and imagery to learn something new.

You can use stickers, stamps, tokens as reward for good behavior. Make sure the rules for earning the tokens are clear and consistent. For example: “Listen to mommy, calm voice, hands to myself.” Stay away from vague rules like “Be good,” and avoid telling her what NOT to do “No crying.” Then when she exhibits the behaviors in the rules, you reward her with a token and praise the good behavior you saw. You might say something like, “Wow, great job listening to mommy/daddy. You earned a happy face!” Once the child with ASD has all the tokens, the child can have a reward. This will help the child with ASD to tolerate the delay in getting what she wants, because she can see that she is working towards it. Here’s a simple example of what it might look like.