ABA Therapy Continues Its Success

PHOTO: The Rogersons are happy their sons Tom (L) and Jack (R) are close but don't think Tom should be responsible for Jack as he grows older. (ABC: Australian Story)

Jack Rogerson was diagnosed with autism as a toddler and written off by many medical professionals as low-functioning and limited to special education schooling. He was a hyperactive child who could not express affection and could barely speak but his parents believed that with the right tools and support, their son would eventually be able to live independently and engage in all the same activities as his peers.

After meeting Dr. Elizabeth Watson, a speech pathologist and therapist, Jack’s parents learned about Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) that is used for early childhood intervention for kids on the spectrum. ABA therapy is essentially “a teaching technique that breaks down every skill that a child needs to learn into very small discrete steps, each of which is taught individually with painstaking repetition and they joined together to complete the task. It is applied to everything from tying shoelaces to social skills and conversation.”

Living in Australia, they found no centers or schools offering ABA therapy and the resources that Jack needed. Wanting to expose Jack to ABA therapy in the hopes that it would help him, Ian and Nicole dedicated themselves to giving Jack the support he needed and turned their house into their own early intervention center. “You’d walk into the house and there’d be labels on things and a big whiteboard and words written on it…and computer screens,” Ian Rogerson explains. “We decided he needed roughly 25 hours a week in that first year of one-on-one therapy,” Nicole said.  

Ian and Jack were determined to mainstream school their son and were eventually able to place him in a public school in Sydney. Jack had an ABA trained helped with him at all times at first to help him adjust to certain routines and behaviors but by the end of his elentary years his ABA helped was only needed for a few hours a week.

Jack went on to the Special Education Inclusion Program where he learned academics as well as domestic life skills. Director of students, Adam Lewis, says, Jack’s help a leadership role this year as a house monitor…He speaks well and politely to the younger guys, he has very high standards himself in terms of how he presents and his own conduct.”

In 2003 Nicole Rogerson decided to team up with Elizabeth Watson to open and establish their own center that specialized in ABA therapy for children on the spectrum. Nicole says she was impressed with Jack’s progress after the therapy. And is now CEO if the non-profit Autism Awareness Australia. She says, “Intensive ABA programs are still the only thing that come out as showing any evidence whatsoever of efficacy, and they’re still not funding it. Unless the government makes a genuine investment in this area, so many children are not going to reach their best outcome and I think that’s a tragedy.”

Shema Kolainu is committed to providing resources for parents and families in all five boroughs and offers a variety of therapies. All of our programs are individualized and based on the science of Applied Behavioral Analysis. To read more about ABA therapy and all the therapies offered by Shema Kolainu, click HERE

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