Understanding Sensory Challenges

Occupational therapist Lindsey Biel, co-author of “Raising a Sensory Smart Child” and “The Definitive Handbook for Helping Your Child with Sensory Processing Issues,” has some important points to make about how to best support a child with sensory issues. As the number of children with autism rises, so does the concern in the autism community for providing the necessary knowledge to understand those affected by sensory overload.

Inspired by Temple Grandin’s book, “Thinking in Pictures,” Biel became facinated with people who see the world in a unique perspective. She explains the importance of educating others about sensory challenges, stemming from her own struggles as a child with issues such as discomfort in fluorescent lighting and noise in the cafeteria. Her first two books were geared towards giving parents and professionals best practices that were usually only implemented during a therapy session or within the school. Her new book “Processing Challenges: Effective Clinical Work with Kids & Teens” is more geared towards professionals in the autism field–psychologists, therapists, social workers, etc. Many times sensory problems are not recognized as the problem and the connection between the sensory challenge and the behavior gets lost. Biel pushes the idea that we need to start to really listen to what people with sensory issues have to say. In order to make a difference in these people’s lives, we need to:

  • Collaborate with individuals who experience the world and their bodies differently and work together
  • Empower people with sensory problems to become  more self aware to self-advocate
  • Share ideas, perspectives in magazine articles both in general parenting and other general consumer publications as well as autism specific publications
  • Speak to parenting groups and have professional workshops, including staff development around these issues

She argues, “There is still so much research, education, and awareness that needs to happen. We still ask students and workers to adjust to schools and workplaces rather than adjusting those environments to meet the need of the user. Parents still have pediatricians who trivialize their concerns about oversensitivities to noise, or clothing fabrics, smells, and so on. And they still have friends and relatives who think they’re indulging their child when they give them movement breaks or special allowances to accommodate their sensory needs…Every parent, teacher, and caregiver needs to know first and foremost that when a person is at the mercy of sensory issues, it can be extraordinarily difficult to behave as expected.”

Some basic tips for caregivers dealing with children on the spectrum are:

  • avoid harsh lighting
  • provide soft and seamless clothing
  • use a reassuring and firm touch
  • speak gently and patiently using clear language that is straightforward and free of unnecessary words 
  • do not demand eye contact when you are speaking
  • understand that they are not going to stop self-stimulatory behaviors just because you tell them to
  • assume competence even if the child/person has yet to prove this to you

Shema Kolainu- Hear Our Voices, offers its students a one-of-a-kind multisensory environment called the Snoezelen room. This room is specially designed to deliver stimuli to various senses using lighting effects, color, sounds, music, and scents. It provides a sense of calm to the child who may be experiencing some form of sensory overload and allows for student and teacher to work on communication, enhance their understanding of each other and build trust. Read more about our state-of-the-art room HERE!

For more resources on handling sensory challenges:

http://sensorysmarts.com/

http://sensoryprocessingchallenges.com/

To read the original interview with Lindsey Biel, click HERE