New Kickboxing Therapy Helps Kids with Autism Spectrum Disorder

Kids part of Fighting for Autism posing with Alex White, UFC and mixed martial arts fighter.

Fighting for Autism is starting a new trial for using kickboxing as a form of therapy for kids on the spectrum. The managing director of US of Fighting for Autism, Brian Higginbotham, who is overseeing their kickboxing therapy program, says “Their first day they couldn’t put a glove on and had no idea how to properly punch. Now they are doing eight strike and ducking under counter punches. It’s pretty cool to see the development and progression of the kids.”

They were able to start this program with the help of Dr. Avi Domnitz-Gebet, a pediatric neurologist at the Pediatric Neurodevelopmental Center in St. Charles and Christina Hannah, owner and inventor of ‘Changeable Chewables.’

So far, with the success they are experiencing, they are hoping to open new kickboxing programs around the world by partnering with other doctors or facilities that would want to host them. Dr. Avi says the program is great for kids and their parents and is a great opportunity to teach self-control, responsibility, and self-esteem. Having the parents involved to interact with their child is a rewarding experience all around.

Joe and Erica Worden, who usually teach MMA training, are also helping kids in the program. Joe explains how “after the first session one kid actually said ‘fun’ to me and his dad said ‘wow, he’s never talked to a stranger before,’ so that’s pretty cool. That is the kind of progress we are seeing, they are focusing more and there is more enjoyment. I would do whatever I needed to do to bring this program out here.”

Kickboxing is a good way for children to really focus on their hand-eye coordination and it puts them in an active environment with other kids and parents they can relate to. Physical exercise is really important for kids with special needs to be healthy and occasionally get out, especially for those on the lower-functioning end of the spectrum.