Unique Faces of Autism

unique

Credit: Lisa Feng

People often say, “If you know one person with autism, you know one person with autism.” But what does this mean? Take two boys Geoffrey Ondrich and Waylon Cude, 16 years old and unrelated, who both have the same diagnosis of autism.

Waylon is a very serious person and also very into computers. He spends the majority of his time playing games online and spent his last summer interning at IBM programming websites. He is a perfectionist when it comes to working on computers. Though he speaks politely and answers questions, especially factual ones, he doesn’t engage in too much other conversation.

On the other hand, we have Geoffrey, who loves his iPad where he watches pieces of his favorite movie or finds music to listen to and starts dancing. His other past times include rocking back and forth and slapping his left wrist onto his right hand. His clinician finds it hard to engage him as he picks up a plate and bites it, then rolls a toy car back and forth on the table.

Two boys, both have the same age and diagnosis, yet are living two very different lives. Geneticist David Ledbetter, chief scientific officer at Geisinger Health System in Danville, Pennsylvania says, “What we’ve learned in the last five years about the underlying genetics is that there are hundreds of, if not a thousand or more, different genetic subtypes of autism.” In the same sense, it is just as no two people have the same personality. Researchers are using this information to try to get to the root cause of autism at the genetic level that could create new treatments in the future that go to the root instead of just addressing the symptoms.

To read more about different mutations triggering different types of behaviors, click HERE