Study on Baby Horses Starts New Research on Autism

baby horses and autism research

It was an unexpected scene- soon after a baby horse was born, owner Ellen Jackson noticed it avoiding its mother and refusing to nurse.

After a few more similar incidents she contacted the University of California Davis veterinary expert John Madigan. He explained that these baby horses are being born with that is called neonatal maladjustment syndrome (MNS), which account for the detachment from their mothers.

To fix the issue he performs “the squeeze” technique where a soft rope is tied around the baby horse’s body. Then it is squeezed to apply increased pressure until the baby horse falls over and goes to sleep. After a few minutes have passed the pressure is released and the baby horse wakes up. When that is complete they see, in almost all cases, an improvement of interaction between the mother and baby horse.

But how does all this relate to humans with autism spectrum disorder? Madigan and a group of researchers are exploring the connection between high levels of neurosteroids (brain steroids) in the blood and development of autism. He states that their effects at different birth stages could give more insight as to why ASD develops later on.

The researchers believe that this study can provide important information on the development of Autism for pre-term infants, cesarean born babies, and newborns who spent little time in the birth canal. Madigan suggests that a lack of pressure through the birth canal prevents the body from receiving the proper signal to lower brain steroid levels.

Pas statistics have shown that those born within these circumstances have a higher likeliness to develop Autism. But is it due to the levels of brain steroids? That is what future research will tell. Madigan’s study on baby horses has prompted a new perspective on discovering a possible explanation for the development of ASD.

David Stevenson, a professor of pediatrics at Stanford University, has come together with Madigan to bring “the squeeze” technique to human infants. Although a little different, they will be using a method called “kangaroo care” which is more commonly used for premature babies. This method requires an almost naked infant is placed on the parent’s, or caregiver’s, chest for a long period of time. They hope to measure the steroid levels to see if there is a drop after this technique has been performed. They will then use these results to expand their research further and possibly find a connection with ASD.

Written by Raiza Belarmino