Tips for Potty Training A Special Needs Child

potty training for special needs

Potty training is one of the most difficult things to do when your baby is progressing into toddlerhood. It’s a long process filled with accidents, impatience, and miscommunication. When you add in the aspect of disability, potty training can be even more difficult.

Children with special needs are not so different from kids who are typically developing. Though they may need to learn in alternate routes, they are capable of coming to the same conclusions and meeting the same goals as their peers. In recognizing this, the following steps have been recommended while toilet training your physically or mentally delayed child.

Recognize that feeling

First, it is important that you teach your child to recognize when it is that they need to go to the bathroom. One of the biggest rookie mistakes for new potty users is that they do not recognize their need and simply eliminate without prior thought, causing accidents. In order to control this, it’s important that you help your child learn to identify what their body is trying to say to them and to act accordingly.

Make sure all steps are followed thoroughly

Once recognition of need and control over elimination have been accomplished, the child must learn proper bathroom etiquette. One might think that potty ending would end as soon as the child learned to use the toilet rather than their parents, but that is not the case!

The following steps need to be taught: recognizing the need to go to the bathroom; waiting to eliminate until an appropriate time; entering the bathroom properly; manipulating clothing closures; pulling pants down; sitting on the toilet; eliminating in the toilet; using toilet paper correctly; pulling pants up; flushing toilet etc.

 

There is no one right way to address these steps with your special needs child. To modify this lesson, you must pay strict attention to your child’s abilities. Though you may have to wait until later in development, it is always possible and surely worth the wait!

Written by Sara Power, Fordham University