Maine Family Moved Across State Lines For Better Autism Services

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A family from Carmel, Maine was forced to move after not being able to find services for their adult autistic child. The Levasseur’s are planning on moving to Virgina, where they hope to find help.

Michael Levasseur, who is 19 years old and has a high school diploma, has been able to hold a few jobs. He also tries to live as independently as he can but he requires supervision. Along with that, Maine’s assistance programs are having funding problems. This has led to individuals being put on waitlists for services they are eligible for but not able to receive.

The Levasseur family had to leave New Hampshire when Michael was 2 years old because there weren’t services for autistic children. Now, they are having the same problem. Michael had the option of staying in school for 2 more years but he opted out of it. He said that he wouldn’t have been able to participate in swim team and he didn’t feel like it was worthwhile.

Michael has always required supervision. His mother, Cynthia, has had to switch or quit jobs to help him. This has led to financial difficulty in the family. However, most recently, Cynthia has been working at G.E.A.R Parent Network, which is a network that offers advice and guidance for parents who have children with behavioral health needs. She says that it is a great job because it helps parents understand and figure out the government bureaucracy, something that she has experience in.

Michael is a high functioning autistic person. Because of this, he is able to cook for himself, use public transportation, and manage some of his money. However, this means that he is also unable to qualify for programs that support housing services. Michael was able to qualify for a state run program that provides job coaches, day activities, and support. But when the 19 year old brought home a pre-made frame, decorated with stickers, his family realized they wanted more for him.

In 2014, the Levasseurs were able to catch the attention of Governor Paul LePage. LePage presented their story in the State of the State address.  LePage suggested increasing spending in order to provide services for elderly and disabled residents of Maine. Gov. LePage and the Department of Health and Human Services Commissioner Mary Mayhew have been working hard to convince legislators to consider increasing funding yet their priorities do not match.

Luckily for our students here at Shema Kolainu, all of their therapy services are provided in a close-knit environment. The kids have experienced enormous growth as they are prepared for adulthood. Getting capable students with autism ready for adulthood is such an important priority as more of them reach maturity every year, ready to contribute to the work force.

Cynthia Levasseur says that she worries about other families. She doesn’t want them to be forced to sell their homes or put a loved one into a nursing home. In Virginia, the Levasseur family hopes to find work for their son so he can continue to live his life.

Original coverage for this article sourced from Bandor Daily News.

Written by Sejal Sheth