Category Archives: Treatment

Autism Resource Shop Opens in the Bay Area

twilight turtle for autism kids

Natural Autism Resources offer therapeutic devices like Twilight Turtle, pictured above

National Autism Resources has been an online retailer since 2008. They are known for providing specialized tools and technologies that cater to the autism community.

In September 2014, the company opened their first physical walk-in store in Benicia, California, a city in the Bay Area region. It is the first store of its kind on the west coast and third in the whole country. The creators are skilled in selecting the right products that are proven to be successful.

Local resident, Kat Negrete, is overjoyed with the news of this new business. She is the mother of 3-year-old Johnny who tends to have trouble with loud noises and transitioning from one thing to the next.

She often uses toys and games to help keep her son calm. But locating these particular toys may be somewhat difficult. Negrete recalls a time where she was so distraught when she visited a well-known teaching supply store that has no resources for special needs children.

National Autism Resources has over 120 vendors that they pull their products from. There is a lot of research and work going into making sure the items they sell will be helpful. This may be the reason why there aren’t more stores like this, but with an estimated 1 in 68 children now being diagnosed with ASD, there still stands a strong need for local, available resources.

Store owner Bonnie Arnwine also has a son with autism and understands the demand for a shop like hers. Here, a shopper can find over 1,600 products that may look like simple toys but are actually effective therapeutic tools.

One example is the GoTalk 9+, their most popular speech device. It helps people who are just starting augmentative communication. There is also an item called Twilight Turtle that is used to help calm children or put them to sleep. The soft lights illuminate the room with constellations, which helps ease the child.  Arnwine believes this is more than just a store or job, but rather her purpose. She quotes her business’s motto, “Love, Hope, and Support Autism.”

Read the original article from CBS San Francisco.



A Passport to Understanding the Nonverbal

nonverbal communication autism

Non-verbality is problematic not only for the obvious impediment to social interaction, but also because it impedes necessary communication. Statistics state that persons on the autism spectrum and other learning disabilities can die up to 20 years prematurely due to a lack of care.

It’s important to note that such a lack of care is not malicious; practitioners and family members simply do not always know when their loved one is in distress. What might appear to be routine stimming (i.e. flapping of the hands) may actually be an attempt to signal an ailment or discomfort for which they cannot find the words to express.

The problem is multi-fold. First, persons with ASD sometimes lack the self-awareness to identify that they are ill or in pain. Second, they may not have the appropriate means to alert others to their distress. Third, certain individuals who are hyposensitive simply may not feel what would be extremely painful for typically developing people. Of course, there are many other reasons behind this debacle, and these are just a few.

To combat such issues, medical health care professionals have developed systems such as visual pain scales, EasyHealth demonstrations, and Books Beyond Words. The latter are particularly useful because they give visual representations of how a person might feel, describe, and treat their ailments.

For those who are nonverbal, the struggle is all the more difficult because they have few means, if any, to properly alert caregivers to their ailments. To combat this, the National Autistic Society has created “passports” for such autistics that they carry on them, detailing their medical history and needs. By compiling this information in a mobile manner, professionals understand why the individual may be acting unusual and possibly identify what the source of their problem is based on past occurrences.

Just because a person can’t say what they’re feeling doesn’t mean that they don’t feel it. Not only does this apply to the autistic community, but to the global community at large. In order to benefit the masses, it’s vital to remember that we don’t all say what’s wrong. Sometimes listening with our eyes, ears, and hearts is the best bridge toward understanding.

By Sara Power, Fordham University



Tennessee’s Artistic Spectrum

artistic spectrum launches

This month, Eastern Tennessee will be raising awareness for Autism Spectrum Disorder in the form of a number of traveling attractions.

Artistic Spectrum is a non-profit founded in Knoxville. They are dedicated to providing creative and recreational opportunities for children on the spectrum while also educating the public about their special needs.

Their goals are three-fold:

  • To organize fine art workshops which develop the individual talents of persons with ASD

  • To facilitate family-oriented events where children with ASD are welcomed and accepted

  • To work with other arts venues and museums to create Autism Arts opportunities for families to attend fine arts performances and events

Thus far, this month’s events have comprised of speciality cocktail hours, sensory-friendly haircuts, and an art field trip via “the Love Bus.” It will be interesting to see what else they have in store for the days to come!



Interpreting the Correlation between Infant Communication and Autism Onset

autism diagnosis

Over the years, researchers have fiercely debated the origins of autism. Theories regarding its conception have targeted everything from inattentive parents to biological bases. Despite their sundry allegations, these theories all have one thing in common: an emphasis on infant development.

Experts maintain that a clear diagnosis of autism cannot be established until early toddlerhood. Before then, behaviors vary too much to create a firm connection. Studies regarding eye movement and tracking have come close to identifying early clues to autism’s onset; however, they remain somewhat insufficient to establish an accurate diagnosis.

Jonathan Green, professor of child and adolescent psychiatry at the University of Manchester, strives to substantiate an intensive evaluation and therapy approach that could create a stronger, more accurate method for infant diagnoses. He is currently supervising a study following 53 at-risk infants in order to document autism’s manifestation.

Green believes that it is a combination of genetic and parenting influences that activates autism during infancy. He has not been satisfied with the popular notion that biology alone determines autism development so he hopes to outline compounding factors. Thus far, he’s discovered that an intensive parental intervention correlates to increased social interaction and attention in the infants.

It is important to note that Green does not place the origin of autism on parents. Rather, he believes that parent-child relationships may simply influence the trajectory at which a biological predisposition towards autism may begin.

His intervention consists of training parents to recognize and interpret attempts at communication, fostering an interest in the infant’s changing attentions, and translating gestures into words to build verbal understanding. It also expounds on electroencephalography findings regarding brain response to speech sounds.

It is too soon to say whether this training can truly alter the course of autism’s development. Nevertheless, Green’s program does provide important feedback to parents regarding how their interactions play into the child’s development, whether they be typically developing or not.

“I don’t want to say that one can ‘cure’ autism like this, that’s not true,” Green says. “But I hope we’ll be able to make a difference.”

Sara Power, Fordham University



Study on Baby Horses Starts New Research on Autism

baby horses and autism research

It was an unexpected scene- soon after a baby horse was born, owner Ellen Jackson noticed it avoiding its mother and refusing to nurse.

After a few more similar incidents she contacted the University of California Davis veterinary expert John Madigan. He explained that these baby horses are being born with that is called neonatal maladjustment syndrome (MNS), which account for the detachment from their mothers.

To fix the issue he performs “the squeeze” technique where a soft rope is tied around the baby horse’s body. Then it is squeezed to apply increased pressure until the baby horse falls over and goes to sleep. After a few minutes have passed the pressure is released and the baby horse wakes up. When that is complete they see, in almost all cases, an improvement of interaction between the mother and baby horse.

But how does all this relate to humans with autism spectrum disorder? Madigan and a group of researchers are exploring the connection between high levels of neurosteroids (brain steroids) in the blood and development of autism. He states that their effects at different birth stages could give more insight as to why ASD develops later on.

The researchers believe that this study can provide important information on the development of Autism for pre-term infants, cesarean born babies, and newborns who spent little time in the birth canal. Madigan suggests that a lack of pressure through the birth canal prevents the body from receiving the proper signal to lower brain steroid levels.

Pas statistics have shown that those born within these circumstances have a higher likeliness to develop Autism. But is it due to the levels of brain steroids? That is what future research will tell. Madigan’s study on baby horses has prompted a new perspective on discovering a possible explanation for the development of ASD.

David Stevenson, a professor of pediatrics at Stanford University, has come together with Madigan to bring “the squeeze” technique to human infants. Although a little different, they will be using a method called “kangaroo care” which is more commonly used for premature babies. This method requires an almost naked infant is placed on the parent’s, or caregiver’s, chest for a long period of time. They hope to measure the steroid levels to see if there is a drop after this technique has been performed. They will then use these results to expand their research further and possibly find a connection with ASD.

Written by Raiza Belarmino



Shema Kolainu Reaches out to Support Autism Parents

 

chani katz shema kolainu

Family time is crucial for building confidence in a child’s life. For parents of a special needs child, the everyday challenges for managing behavior and raising a self-sufficient child are magnified.

Yesterday’s Shema Kolainu workshop at Hotel Pennsylvania, hosted by IEP Coordinator Chani Katz, MA, BCBA, gave support for parents who have an autistic child. Ms. Katz presented strategies for parents to cope with routine issues, ranging from sibling relationships to toilet training.

Whether public or private, parenting a child with autism can feel stressful and even lonely. Others around will be quick to judge a parent’s methods before they have ever tried to walk in their shoes. Shema Kolainu- Hear Our Voices strives to not only provide top-notch education for our students, but also to help give parents the tools for success.

“It definitely brings a lot of lessons to the family when everyone is able to become more nurturing and empathetic,” Ms. Katz said when addressing the crowd.

Milestone’s in a young child’s life such as sleeping through the night or using the toilet properly can put them outside of their comfort zone. For an autistic child, creating a training schedule can prove quite helpful since they love structure. Other tips that have proven effective are to use positive reinforcement of good behaviors and to create a calming environment for activities the child may feel overwhelmed by.

When parenting a special needs child, it is important to remember that each sibling deserves just as much love. The other children may feel jealous and lonely when they feel that their sibling gets priority and extra attention. Some things that parents may do to combat this is to involve themselves daily in their children’s hobbies. Even if they only have a few minutes to devote to a child at the end of the day when they are drawing pictures, for instance, it makes them feel special.

It also helps to reach out for support when tasks become too overbearing for parents. Behavioral intervention services from a professional are often quite important for a child’s development. Parents may also choose to seek out support groups of other children like them to share wisdom. Sometimes, the help of a housekeeper can ease stress.

Above all, educating the public about autism seems to be the most effective way to minimize negativity from other. Katz suggests helping more “atypical” siblings through difficult situations by encouraging them to talk about it, and also to be open with others in the community about a child’s special needs.



Autism May Hide Anxiety Symptoms

anxiety and autism

Imagine living in a world that changes day-to-day. That doesn’t sound too much different from reality right? Now say that this change involves disastrous sounds, alien people, and foreign territories. Sound like your typical, every day transition? Generally, this is how persons with autism experience change, and it is why they are so resistant to it.

When we see one disorder occurring at the same time as another, we call it comorbid. With autism, one such comorbid disorder is that of anxiety. Anxiety is defined as being a nervous disorder characterized by extreme unease and discomfort. Often it is seen in the form of obsessive-compulsive behaviors and panic attacks.

Persons with autism are known for their resistance to change. It is because of this that anxiety is often overlooked as an actual disorder when it co-occurs with autism. Panic in response to a change in routine may be looked at as obstinate behavior when in fact the person in question feels crippling anxiety.

Part of the problem with diagnosing anxiety in autism comes from the fact that such individuals have difficulty describing their emotional state; as a result, professionals don’t get a clear understanding of what exactly is going on in their heads. However, the error has been attributed to diagnostic tests that fail to acknowledge the many ways in which anxiety manifests itself.

The National Institute of Mental Health is currently working on challenging the diagnostic criteria for anxiety so that they can treat it more successfully with pharmaceuticals and behavioral therapy. For the autistic community, such a change could mean access to the kinds of solutions that would relieve the 63% of afflicted persons that experience overwhelming panic on a nearly daily basis. Hopefully, NIMH will pull through, but in the meantime it is important that autism professionals familiarize themselves with the trademarks of anxiety so as to improve the quality of care for their clients.

Sara Power, Fordham University



Utilizing Restricted Interests Improves Reading Comprehension

literacy research for autism

Narrow, specific interests are a characteristic for those with autism spectrum disorder. A group of university researchers wants to channel this tendency into a method that will improve literacy.

“Perseverative interest” is the term that describes this phenomenon. Researchers at UVA have discovered that by including a child’s restricted interests frequently in their reading material, literacy instruction may improve the child’s comprehension.

University of Virginia Curry School of Education Professor Michael Solis collaborated with Cleveland University Professor Farah El Zein and designed a literacy curriculum which uses a child’s specific interests frequently within a story. If a child loves trains, the texts references trains several times.

When he tested his model, Solis discovered that the method improved enagement with the material for the children who participated. They then performed better on curriculum-based tests as well following the experiment.

Solis was inspired to delve into this research after conducting a thorough search on the availability of instructional methods designed to improve the scholastic performance of children with autism. He discovered that there was a surprising lack of such data available on reading comprehension, and much of the data available lacked stringency.

According to Solis, most of the specialized instruction for autistic children focuses on improving their social skills and behavior. The most widely accepted methods for increasing reading comprehension among children with autism is to apply the same methods used for a variety of disabilities.

Since Solis is an expert on tailoring reading instruction to suit a variety of special needs, he set out to create a more specialized, and therefore more effective method of teaching reading comprehension to children with autism.

“Reading comprehension is critical to academic success, enabling attendance in college and meaningful employment,” Solis said to NBC29. “We really need to close that gap. Conventional reading interventions used in special education classrooms are not bringing the results with children of autism as they are with others.”



Video Therapy Improving Life for Children with Autism

video therapy autism

In this latest study, Prof. Green and his team investigated the effectiveness of early intervention with an adapted Video Interaction for Promoting Positive Parenting Program (iBASIS-VIPP) for improving social interaction among young infants at high familial risk of autism.
This program involved 54 families with children who were either at risk for Autism or have been diagnosed with autism. Each of the families were videotaped while interacting with the child. The videos were archived and replayed for the families. The videos allowed the families the opportunity to see their child’s likes, dislikes, and triggers. Studies have typically made the person living with autism the subject, but this study makes the family the subject for evaluation.
Here at ICare4Autism, believe that the efforts we take to assist a child with autism should be as a group. The world is a child with Autism’s family. It is our responsibility to make them happy, comfortable, safe, and knowledgable!


Compliments to Complementary Therapy for ASD

autism alternative treatment

One of the most challenging aspects of dealing with ASD is that there is no one solution.

In order to properly care and provide for persons with this disorder, treatment must be given in a multi-faceted manner. Therapists such as the renowned Steven Rudelhoff recognize just how important this is.

This past week, Rudelhoff received a Highly Commended award in the category of Best Complementary Medicine Practitioner. This award is in conjunction with the Institute of Complementary Natural Medicine Awards, held in London England. The reason? His amazing work with integrating aromatherapy massage, sound healing, and energy healing.

Alternative medical treatments are readily available, but the science behind such healing is hotly debated. Though such treatments spark a lot of controversy regarding whether or not they truly address the symptoms of ASD, Rudelhoff is confident that he is making a difference.

“Both caregivers and parents have seen big improvements in the behavioral patterns of my clients,” he said in an interview. “They have become calmer in general and when they need to release stress, it is released more gently. They have become more balanced in every part of their lives and are happier within themselves.”

Clearly, the Institute of Complementary Natural Medicine agrees. To find out more about Rudelhoff’s work, you can check out his website at www.reikiwithrudelhoff.com where you will find his contact info.

………………………………………………………….

Sara Power, Fordham University