Category Archives: Treatment

Autism May Hide Anxiety Symptoms

anxiety and autism

Imagine living in a world that changes day-to-day. That doesn’t sound too much different from reality right? Now say that this change involves disastrous sounds, alien people, and foreign territories. Sound like your typical, every day transition? Generally, this is how persons with autism experience change, and it is why they are so resistant to it.

When we see one disorder occurring at the same time as another, we call it comorbid. With autism, one such comorbid disorder is that of anxiety. Anxiety is defined as being a nervous disorder characterized by extreme unease and discomfort. Often it is seen in the form of obsessive-compulsive behaviors and panic attacks.

Persons with autism are known for their resistance to change. It is because of this that anxiety is often overlooked as an actual disorder when it co-occurs with autism. Panic in response to a change in routine may be looked at as obstinate behavior when in fact the person in question feels crippling anxiety.

Part of the problem with diagnosing anxiety in autism comes from the fact that such individuals have difficulty describing their emotional state; as a result, professionals don’t get a clear understanding of what exactly is going on in their heads. However, the error has been attributed to diagnostic tests that fail to acknowledge the many ways in which anxiety manifests itself.

The National Institute of Mental Health is currently working on challenging the diagnostic criteria for anxiety so that they can treat it more successfully with pharmaceuticals and behavioral therapy. For the autistic community, such a change could mean access to the kinds of solutions that would relieve the 63% of afflicted persons that experience overwhelming panic on a nearly daily basis. Hopefully, NIMH will pull through, but in the meantime it is important that autism professionals familiarize themselves with the trademarks of anxiety so as to improve the quality of care for their clients.

Sara Power, Fordham University



Utilizing Restricted Interests Improves Reading Comprehension

literacy research for autism

Narrow, specific interests are a characteristic for those with autism spectrum disorder. A group of university researchers wants to channel this tendency into a method that will improve literacy.

“Perseverative interest” is the term that describes this phenomenon. Researchers at UVA have discovered that by including a child’s restricted interests frequently in their reading material, literacy instruction may improve the child’s comprehension.

University of Virginia Curry School of Education Professor Michael Solis collaborated with Cleveland University Professor Farah El Zein and designed a literacy curriculum which uses a child’s specific interests frequently within a story. If a child loves trains, the texts references trains several times.

When he tested his model, Solis discovered that the method improved enagement with the material for the children who participated. They then performed better on curriculum-based tests as well following the experiment.

Solis was inspired to delve into this research after conducting a thorough search on the availability of instructional methods designed to improve the scholastic performance of children with autism. He discovered that there was a surprising lack of such data available on reading comprehension, and much of the data available lacked stringency.

According to Solis, most of the specialized instruction for autistic children focuses on improving their social skills and behavior. The most widely accepted methods for increasing reading comprehension among children with autism is to apply the same methods used for a variety of disabilities.

Since Solis is an expert on tailoring reading instruction to suit a variety of special needs, he set out to create a more specialized, and therefore more effective method of teaching reading comprehension to children with autism.

“Reading comprehension is critical to academic success, enabling attendance in college and meaningful employment,” Solis said to NBC29. “We really need to close that gap. Conventional reading interventions used in special education classrooms are not bringing the results with children of autism as they are with others.”



Video Therapy Improving Life for Children with Autism

video therapy autism

In this latest study, Prof. Green and his team investigated the effectiveness of early intervention with an adapted Video Interaction for Promoting Positive Parenting Program (iBASIS-VIPP) for improving social interaction among young infants at high familial risk of autism.
This program involved 54 families with children who were either at risk for Autism or have been diagnosed with autism. Each of the families were videotaped while interacting with the child. The videos were archived and replayed for the families. The videos allowed the families the opportunity to see their child’s likes, dislikes, and triggers. Studies have typically made the person living with autism the subject, but this study makes the family the subject for evaluation.
Here at ICare4Autism, believe that the efforts we take to assist a child with autism should be as a group. The world is a child with Autism’s family. It is our responsibility to make them happy, comfortable, safe, and knowledgable!


Compliments to Complementary Therapy for ASD

autism alternative treatment

One of the most challenging aspects of dealing with ASD is that there is no one solution.

In order to properly care and provide for persons with this disorder, treatment must be given in a multi-faceted manner. Therapists such as the renowned Steven Rudelhoff recognize just how important this is.

This past week, Rudelhoff received a Highly Commended award in the category of Best Complementary Medicine Practitioner. This award is in conjunction with the Institute of Complementary Natural Medicine Awards, held in London England. The reason? His amazing work with integrating aromatherapy massage, sound healing, and energy healing.

Alternative medical treatments are readily available, but the science behind such healing is hotly debated. Though such treatments spark a lot of controversy regarding whether or not they truly address the symptoms of ASD, Rudelhoff is confident that he is making a difference.

“Both caregivers and parents have seen big improvements in the behavioral patterns of my clients,” he said in an interview. “They have become calmer in general and when they need to release stress, it is released more gently. They have become more balanced in every part of their lives and are happier within themselves.”

Clearly, the Institute of Complementary Natural Medicine agrees. To find out more about Rudelhoff’s work, you can check out his website at www.reikiwithrudelhoff.com where you will find his contact info.

………………………………………………………….

Sara Power, Fordham University



Video-based therapy may help treat infants at risk for autism

video based therapy for autism

In the year 2000, one child out of 150 children born was diagnosed with autism.  Today, one out of 68 children will now be affected by it.  As the number of children born with autism increases each year, doctors are attempting to treat the condition by testing children as early as three or four years old.

Early signs of autism in babies, such as not responding to their names by one year of age or not showing any interest in objects by 14 months, can be an indicator that therapy may be needed to prevent further advancement of the condition.  Some families have a relatively low risk of having a child born with autism, while other families are more likely to have a child who has the condition if they have a family history of autism.

Dr. Jonathan Green and his team at the University of Manchester in the UK are now studying the effects of an adapted Video Interaction for Promoting Positive Parenting Program (i-BASIS-VIPP), a new treatment for early onset autism in infants.  The treatment uses video feedback that allows parents to learn how to communicate with their child’s unique communication style.  Over time, this could help the child develop stronger communication and social skills.

With the help of a therapist, video recordings of parent-infant interactions are done privately in the parents’ home.  When reviewing the recordings, parents can view how they can improve their interactions with their infant.  The study used 54 families who had an infant between seven to 10 months old.  During a five month period, some families used i-BASIS-VIPP treatment, while the other families received no treatment.

At the end of the experiment, the Autism Observation Scale for Infants (AOSI) was used to determine autism scores of the infants in the study.  The infants of the families who used the new treatment showed improved attention and social behavior and had lower AOSI scores than the children who received no treatment at all.

Although the study has not yet proven to eliminate autism in babies, it is a stepping stone for more research that will reveal more about the effects of i-BASIS-VIPP and its possibilities of reducing early autism symptoms.

Mara Papleo, Cleveland State University



“Happy Birthday!” means “Hallelujah!” for Parents of Autistic Girl

5 year old autistic girls speaks after years of silence

Picture a sweet babbling toddler. Now picture a three-year-old screaming and slamming her head every time you try to exit the house. Cue the early years of Ave Arreola.

Despite a rough birth in which her twin sister died, Ave began life similarly to any other baby. She followed typical developmental patterns, babbling and engaging with her surroundings, until the age of 2, when she abruptly fell silent and stopped interacting with her parents and peers. A diagnosis of “autism” shortly followed as her temper tantrums escalated. Her parents desperately sought a solution to calm their daughter’s seemingly unstable reality.

The Arreola family started bringing Ave to therapy at the Center for Children with Autism at Metrocare Services in Dallas, TX. Metrocare Services opened a few years ago after administration noticed the growing population of autistics in the Dallas area. The center just opened a second location recently, so they are now able to serve an additional 270 children with ASD who come from low-income backgrounds.

Despite a rocky start, therapists there have been able to begin developing routines and coping mechanisms for Ave to attach to during times of emotional duress. The center teaches social skills to the children and helps parents develop custom programs to help their children.

After years of silence, 5 year old Ave unexpectedly wished her 19 year-old brother a “Happy Birthday!” while the family was celebrating. They are the first words she has spoken since she was two. Since then, she’s begun singing along to TV shows, and her speech therapists have had greater success in reciprocally communicating with her.

“I don’t think we ever give up on the hope that a child will talk,” said Sarah Loera, program manager at the Center for Children, to Dallas News.

Work with the Metrocare clinic has not only given the Arreola’s daughter’s voice back, but has stabilized their entire family structure. Therapists have helped them design behavioral strategies for Ave to follow, and have given them advice on how to make Ave’s immediate world a little less daunting.

Sara Power, Fordham University



Quick Behavioral Observations Frequently Overlook Signs of Autism

Lynn Burton reads to her daughter Adelaide. Many toddlers her age are not receiving potentially life-saving autism screenings. | Medical XPress

Lynn Burton reads to her daughter Adelaide. Many toddlers her age are not receiving potentially life-saving autism screenings. | Medical XPress

Parents should not rely solely on a medical professional to detect a child’s autism, according to a new study published in the journal Pediatrics.

Research shows that bringing a child to a 10-20 minute pediatric behavior monitoring session is not sufficient to determine if a child has autism. Parents who trust that their child’s doctor will be thorough in their examination without paying attention to their child’s developmental signs day to day could be missing some key information.

These short sessions simply do not give the clinician enough time with your child to make an accurate diagnosis. The medical professional cannot gather enough information at a simple checkup. Thus, many children with autism will show normal behavior during this window, and will not get referred to a professional who can provide the treatment needed.

If autism symptoms are missed early on in a child’s life, they may miss a crucial point in their development in which early intervention is most effective. Autistic children who receive early intervention and treatment before age three have been shown to vastly conquer or eliminate their symptoms before entering school. Just like learning a new language, changing the child’s brain in this way becomes more difficult after they leave the toddler years behind.

In the study, ten minute videos of children ages 15-33 months were viewed by experts in the field. Children with autism, speech delays, and normal development were all included. It was found that the quick observation was not sufficient to gather accurate conclusions, and the experts missed 39 percent of the children with autism since they displayed typical behavior during this time.

The CDC reports that autism diagnoses have increased 30 percent during the past two years, when the statistic jumped from 1 in 88 to 1 in 68 children. This is why a correct diagnosis early on is especially important.

What this means for young children with autism is that they would benefit from more detailed observation. Exploring in-depth autism screenings and extra attention from parents are key steps in understanding a child’s development.

A parent usually knows their children more intimately than anyone else, and if educated properly, can recognize the symptoms of autism on their own, and alert the child’s care provider to determine the next step.

The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends a formal autism screening for children at the 18 and 24 month mark. A few simple screening tools that help parents know the signs to look for are available to use free of charge. One of these is the M-CHAT-R Checklist. Another resource to use is the CDCs Learn The Signs, Act Early campaign.



Early Intervention: How Effective Is It?

early intervention success

Children are the most precious gifts that any mother could have.

Before the child even takes its first breath of air in this world, a mother carries him or her for a full for nine months. In those nine months, a woman is advised to take care of herself, her body, and her soon-to-be child by  exercising as much caution as possible with her daily routine. A mother creates a relationship with her child in those nine months through the simple things such as the way he or she may kick or move. As we all know, having a child comes great responsibility, no matter what kind of problems it may come with on both the physical and mental spectrum.

Normally, autistic children do not show noticeable signs of their disorder until they are around the age of three. Even though the signs may be hard to find when they are very young, there are ways to determine if your child may have autism. To begin, it is common for children that have autism to lag in their speech development. They cannot make certain sounds or many noises to “talk” or communicate with their loved ones, or whoever it may be. They also tend to be focused on one object or concept for a very long period of time, which makes it hard to direct his or her attention towards something else.

Kristin Hinson, who is a mother of four, participated in a study conducted by Sally Rogers, a professor of psychiatry and behavioral studies at UC Davis MIND Institute. Hinson began to see signs indicating that her son Noah may have autism when he was just nine months old. Rogers was curious what a difference it would make if parents intervened before their children were officially diagnosed with autism.

The study involved behavioral therapy for twelve weeks, in which Hinson was taught behavioral mechanisms and techniques, including sensory. Six other parents that saw signs of autism with their toddlers participated as well.  After therapy was over, 18 month-old Noah caught up developmentally with other children his age, if not even better. He became more engaged. Along with Noah, the six other children showed much more improvement.

The sample size for this study was small, so it is difficult to draw a conclusion stating that early intervention before age three can prevent autism symptoms from becoming severe later on. But in general, scientists do agree that early intervention can change the outcome for toddlers at risk for the disorder.

Taja Nicolle Kenney, Eerie Community College



Nonverbal Children Show Marked Improvement Using Video Series

 

Gemiini

An innovative yet relatively simple video series therapy may prove effective in treating speech disorders.

Laura Kasbar’s twins were diagnosed with autism as young children. They did not respond to the speech therapies offered to them, so Kasbar realized that she had to search for an effective solution to their speaking difficulty.

Now Kasbar’s twins are grown and they excel college. Their mother claims that a large part of their success can be credited to her invention, The Gemiini System. This series of speech therapy videos may soon be reaching children all over the country, or possibly the world.

Videos from the Gemiini System lay things out in a way that children understand. For each word, a child appears onscreen accompanied by a picture demonstrating the word’s meaning. The word is spoken slowly and clearly several times. This includes a close up of the child’s mouth when speaking the word.

The Gemiini system uses a method called “discreet video modeling.” This method is effective for many because it presents words with their associations so the children grasp their meaning. This direct approach allows autistic children to concentrate on learning.

Dr. Amanda Adams, Clinical Director of The California Autism Center and Learning Group in Fresno, California, is interested in using the Gemiini system, stating it can work well when combined with other therapies.

“Along with good behavior intervention, a good school program and all of the other pieces still in play, this tool I see as a supplement.” says Adams.

Dr. Heather O’Shea with autism therapy provider ACES in Fresno, is looking forward to using this therapy within her own company.

“We’re very excited about it. We are starting to implement it, the research is giving me great hope,” says Dr. O’Shea.

Since Laura Kasbar’s twins have progressed so well, she is optimistic about the success of other children using The Gemiini System. She emphasizes the importance of starting such therapies young, in order to increase the chances of lessening or eliminating speech difficulties the children face.

These videos are available online for parents, teachers, and therapists. This is good news for families that struggle with insurance coverage for the therapies they need.

The website asserts that The Gemiini System may also be used for children who struggle with reading. Additionally, Kasbar says the system is effective for adults who need speech therapy. These include stroke survivors, those affected by dementia, and patients with traumatic brain injury.



California Ranch Would Provide Work and Direction for Adults with Autism

Autistic Farm Workers

Every year, approximately 50,000 people with autism graduate from the school system. That’s as large as many US cities.

In Solano County, California, Jeanine Stanley wants to bring to fruition a ranch that would give some of these young adults a place to go. When her son Ben was diagnosed with autism at age 3, Stanley did not know where to turn since so little was known about asd.

“You end up teaching the teachers,” she told the San Jose Mercury News. “We had to be the pioneers.”

The involved Lafayette mother spent the remainder of her son’s career in school researching all the best therapies and ensuring he received the best treatment possible in order to ensure his academic success. The question remained, however, as to what would become of him when school was completed.

To address this issue for her son and others like him, Ms. Stanley has been working with other advocates to fund a ranch in Fairfield where autistic individuals can apply their talents into practical work. Named after her son (whose middle name is Walker) the property is being referred to as the B. Walker Ranch.

Young adults with autism have are often praised for their ability to focus on independent tasks. With about 1 in 68 people being diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder, few programs exist that help channel their abilities. Around 70 percent of these adults suffer from unemployment or underemployment.

Stanley thought back to her own childhood experiences working on a commercial flower farm with her family, and the idea for the program was born. It is her aspiration to connect with autistics who have little direction in their lives, and work with them to determine their strengths. They are then matched with tasks on the working day ranch in order to give them a sense of purpose.

Each participant will have the program tailored to suit their strengths and needs. Tasks include making jam, pulling weeds, and fixing equipment like tractors. Individuals on the spectrum often excel at repetitive tasks and seek detailed organization.

The creators of the ranch not only aim to provide structured work for the participants, they also want to use these tasks to teach problem solving, valuable work skills, and coping skills. The ranch will also provide art therapy and occupational therapy.

The 10 acre property lies just west of Fairfield and was gifted to Stanley’s organization by a benefactor and includes a 19th century house and barn. They have secured a 99-year lease so ensure the program’s longevity. The California ranch is located near bus and train transit lines. The organizers of the B. Walker Ranch hope to begin with 25 workers.