Tag Archives: autism donation

GPS Trackers May Become Available for Families

Earlier this year, following Avonte Oquendo’s tragic death, Senator Charles Schumer introduced a bill that would allocate $10 million per year in federal funding that would provide electronic tracking devices to families of children with autism and other disabilities. “Our children are too precious for us to wait another day when life-saving precautions are right at out fingertips. Even if we do everything in our power, we may not be able to stop kids from wandering, but we can do much, much more to safely locate them and bring them home.” 

According to Schumer, New York Reps. Peter King and Grace Meng will introduce a companion bill with bipartisan support to the House of Representatives. The proposal allocates funds to the U.S Department of Justice that would give grants to local law enforcement agencies to provide families with tracking devices. In the meantime, Attorney General Eric Holder has said, back in January, that the Justice Department would offer existing grants to local police departments in the meantime. However, Schumer remains headstrong in pushing this legislation so that there is permanent funding.

Researchers have found that only about half of those children with Autism have the tendency to wander, and the free GPS service would of course be available as requested by parents. GPS trackers can be a great resource for families who are especially worried about their child’s safety. Trax Families, a GPS technology company, who was also present at the ICare4Autism International Autism Conference, has actually designed a small personal GPS tracker that can be monitored through an app or on the computer. It is especially designed for 2-7 year olds as something small and lightweight that won’t get in the way of their daily activities. For more information on Trax Family, click HERE



Workforce

It is never too early to start thinking about transitions for your child. One of the biggest transitions will be from school to a workplace. Shema Kolainu understands the challenges that individuals with autism will face while searching for a job. That is why we will include the Global Autism Workforce Initiative in our International Autism Conference on June 30, 2014. This part of the conference will be specifically dedicated to developing and promoting Autism Workforce Programs.

A lot of businesses have started to realize that individuals with autism have a lot of talents that they can bring to a company. Some of the companies that are providing jobs for individuals with autism are ASP, Semperical and Walgreens. Andy Travaglia, owner at Lee & Marie’s Cakery and Bar Crudo in New York employs adults with autism. Andy organized her own bakery business because she had a dream to help people with autism by providing them with a workplace.

Employment not only gives financial independence for those with autism, but also an ability to gain social skills and self-confidence. People on the autism spectrum may take a longer time to train, but when they are ready to perform, autistic workers make exceptionally hardworking and reliable employees.

For more information about our conference, please visit https://www.eventbrite.com/e/2014-icare4autism-international-autism-conference-registration-10555077521

Original story http://blogs.miaminewtimes.com/shortorder/2014/03/andrea_travaglia_owner_of_lee.php



The Basketball League for Children with Autism.

 

minnesota.cbslocal.com

 

Sport therapy is important for kids with autism and at the same time it could be a great challenge for them. Some of the issues are motor functioning problems, difficulty in planning and low motivation. Exercise and team sports, such as soccer, baseball and flag football, can be a great benefit to improve these problems and also enhance the quality of everyday life for children with autism. We have talked about yoga and martial arts, having a positive impact on the behavior of children with autism, but how about a real team sport such as basketball?

The Minnesota Autism center organized a Basketball league for children with autism about three years ago. This Autism center in South Central Minnesota is a non-profit organization that support families affected by autism. The basketball league is a great success for the center and the Minnesota community.   Team sports help these kids learn how to communicate with each other and how to express themselves in a small group and listening to a coach give directions.   With every ball in the basket, kid’s faces light up with pride. The ability to accomplish goal, compete and to work with a group significantly boosts their confidence, which increases children overall happiness.

 

Original story http://minnesota.cbslocal.com/2014/03/18/league-introduces-team-sports-to-kids-with-autism/

 



New York Autistic-Friendly Disney Live Show

We, at Shema Kolainu are very excited about the autism-friendly Disney live show that will take place during Autism Awareness month in New York . The Theater Fund has helped organize autism friendly performances for young children and adults in the past, including famous Broadway shows like “Lion King,”  “Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark” and “Wicked”. This time Fund created an autism-friendly show by calibrating with Feld Entertainment, Inc. with main focus on younger audience.

Most children with autism cannot attend regular theaters as well as  movie theaters, due to the anxiety they get during the performance or movie. This show is constructed without strobe lights and loud sounds, specifically to make autistic children comfortable. Also, venue will have quiet areas with coloring books, beanbag chairs and autism experts. This calibration will provide a new place where New York  families will be able to engage with their kids. “Disney Junior Live On Tour! Pirate & Princess Adventure” will open doors on April 19, 2014 at the Theater at Madison Square Garden.

 

 

 

 

 

 

“This image released by The Theatre Development Fund shows the cast of ‘Disney Junior Live On Tour! Pirate & Princess Adventure.’ ”

Original story http://www.tdf.org/TDF_SupportPage.aspx?id=137

To learn more about autism please click here http://www.shemakolainu.org/newsite/What is Autism



One Third of Young Adults with Autism Lack Employment, Education

One Third of Young Adults with Autism Lack Employment, Education

A recent study has found that one in 3 young adults with autism have no paid job experience, college or technical schooling nearly seven years after high school graduation. Continue reading



Finding the Right Doctor for Your Child with Autism

Finding the Right Doctor for Your Child With Autism

Finding the right doctor to help your child with autism can be a difficult assignment. However, there are several resources which can help you including the approved Doctor Listing, which has doctors recommended by parents in the autism community. Continue reading



Co-op Helps Children with Autism Get iPads

Ipads for Autism

For parents of children with autism, the iPad has been a godsend. And now, thanks to the help of an electric cooperative, anIndianaschool has been able to get several of the devices to help students with autism learn. Continue reading



Schoolyard Designed for Children with Autism

Schoolyard Designed for Children with Autism

A Kansas State University graduate student is creating a schoolyard that can become a therapeutic landscape for children with autism.

Chelsey King, master’s student in landscape architecture, St. Peters, Mo., is working with Katie Kingery-Page, assistant professor of landscape architecture, to envision a place where elementary school children with autism could feel comfortable and included.

“My main goal was to provide different opportunities for children with autism to be able to interact in their environment without being segregated from the rest of the school,” King said. “I didn’t want that separation to occur.”

The schoolyard can be an appealing place for children with autism, King said, if it provides several aspects: clear boundaries, a variety of activities and activity level spaces, places where the child can go when over stimulated, opportunities for a variety of sensory input without being overwhelming and a variety of ways to foster communication between peers.

King researched ways that she could create an environment where children with autism would be able to interact with their surroundings and their peers, but where they could also get away from over stimulation until they felt more comfortable and could re-enter the activities.

“Through this research, I was able to determine that therapies and activities geared toward sensory stimulation, cognitive development, communication skills, and fine and gross motor skills — which traditionally occur in a classroom setting — could be integrated into the schoolyard,” King said.

King designed her schoolyard with both traditional aspects — such as a central play area — and additional elements that would appeal to children with autism, including:

  • A music garden where children can play with outdoor musical instruments to help with sensory aspects.
  • An edible garden/greenhouse that allows hands-on interaction with nature and opportunities for horticulture therapy.
  • A sensory playground, which uses different panels to help children build tolerances to difference sensory stimulation.
  • A butterfly garden to encourage nature-oriented learning in a quiet place.
  • A variety of alcoves, which provide children with a place to get away when they feel overwhelmed and want to regain control.

King created different signs and pictures boards around these schoolyard elements, so that it was easier for children and teachers to communicate about activities.

“It is important to make the children feel included in the schoolyard without being overwhelmed,” King said. “It helps if they have a place — such as a hill or an alcove — where they can step away from it and then rejoin the activity when they are ready.

“Most children spend seven to nine hours per weekday in school settings,” Kingery-Page said. “Designing schoolyards that are educational, richly experiential, with potentially restorative nature contact for children should be a community concern.”

Read more.



New Autism Social Learning Software A Success

New Autism Social Learning Software A Success

The Language Express, a developer of social learning software for children on the autism spectrum, received its first round of seed funding from a private investment firm. The company’s initial product, The Social Express™, is a 16-lesson autism app that’s receiving enthusiastic reviews from parents, therapists, educators, and bloggers. Continue reading



Divorce and Autism

Divorce and Autism

A study presented in 2010 by Dr. Brian Freedman of the Kennedy Krieger Institute found there was no increase in divorce rates for parents who have a child with autism. According to their research, “64% of children with autism lived with married or adoptive parents compared to a rate of 65% for children with no autism diagnosis”. Continue reading