Special Education Expert Presents Music Education Strategies & Strengths

Tuesday, at Shema Kolainu Hear Our Voices, Stephen Shore Ed. D. held a workshop on music education for children on the autism spectrum. Shore completed his doctoral degree in special education at Boston University and now teaches at Adelphi University in New York. Having been diagnosed on the autism spectrum and non-verbal until the age of 4, Shore brings a unique perspective to the field of special education. He attributes much of his success to the comprehensive interventions his parents guided and the music education he received from an early age. Subsequently, his approach to education is one of both specialization and inclusion. Shore’s strategies are developed particularly for the varying abilities of autistics, but are applicable for neurotypical education as well, allowing for integrated classrooms. While music is often recognized for it’s therapeutic benefits, Shore’s focus is not therapy, but structured, sustained education. Today’s workshop demonstrated the potential of music education to increase communicative abilities, strengthen neurological development in youth, foster social inclusion, and provide potential career paths for those with Autism Spectrum Disorders. Shore charismatically relayed stories of his students’ astonishing talents. One anecdote told of a non-verbal young man who, when guided hand-over-hand while playing piano, sang clear as day. Shore suggests that the structure, support, and focus the student experienced while guided to play the piano enabled him to sing, though he could not speak typically. Drawing from examples of students demonstrating expert knowledge in areas, who are unable to express understanding through certain mediums, Shore makes the case for specialized assessments in education in general, not just for students with developmental disabilities.

Check out Dr. Stephen Shore’s work and many publications at his website: http://www.autismasperger.net/. The workshop, ‘Music for Children on the Autism Spectrum,’ will be streaming soon—stay tuned to see Dr. Stephen Shore speak

Debate Over Whether it’s Possible to ‘Grow Out Of Autism’

Researchers believe they have shown that children who had been diagnosed with autism at a young age can cease to display symptoms when they are older.

In a study, they found one-third of parents with children who had ever been diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder believed their child no longer had the condition, the Daily Mail reported.

A team, led by Dr Andrew Zimmerman from Massachusetts General Hospital for Children, studied data from a phone survey of 92,000 parents of children aged 17 and younger in the U.S in 2007 and 2008. Continue reading

Infant Lip Reading Could Lead to Earlier Diagnosis of Autism

Research into the way babies learn to talk could have a big impact on allowing earlier diagnosis of autism spectrum disorders.

New research suggests that babies don’t just learn from hearing sounds but also learn through lip reading.

Florida scientists discovered that starting around age 6 months, babies begin shifting from the intent eye gaze of early infancy to studying mouths when people talk to them.

“The baby in order to imitate you has to figure out how to shape their lips to make that particular sound they’re hearing,” explains developmental psychologist David Lewkowicz of Florida Atlantic University, who led the study.

This fascinating study into the way babies develop language skills could provide insights into identifying when there are blocks in this process. Continue reading

GLOBAL LEADERS IN FIGHT AGAINST AUTISM CONVERGE IN NEW YORK CITY

“Hope and Urgency” Key Themes at ICare4Autism 2011 International Conference
7/11/11 – (NYC)      On July 6th, 2011, more than 400 of the world’s leading autism researchers, clinicians, educators and policymakers gathered at Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York City to participate in ICare4Autism’s 2011 International Conference “Autism: A Global Perspective.”    Continue reading

GLOBAL LEADERS IN FIGHT AGAINST AUTISM CONVERGE IN NEW YORK CITY

“Hope and Urgency” Key Themes at ICare4Autism 2011 International Conference
7/11/11 – (NYC)      On July 6th, 2011, more than 500 of the world’s leading autism researchers, clinicians, educators and policymakers gathered at Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York City to participate in ICare4Autism’s 2011 International Conference “Autism: A Global Perspective.”

The purpose of the conference was to share recent research into the causes and treatment of Autism Spectrum Disorders, and to be a catalyst for powerful interdisciplinary collaborations to tackle the global autism crisis.  Continue reading

OVER 500 ATTEND ICare4Autism’s JULY 6th CONFERENCE at EINSTEIN

GLOBAL LEADERS IN FIGHT AGAINST AUTISM CONVERGE IN NEW YORK CITY

“Hope and Urgency” Key Themes at ICare4Autism 2011 International Conference

 

7/11/11 – (NYC)      On July 6th, 2011, more than 500 of the world’s leading autism researchers, clinicians, educators and policymakers gathered at Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York City to participate in ICare4Autism’s 2011 International Conference “Autism: A Global Perspective.”

The purpose of the conference was to share recent research into the causes and treatment of Autism Spectrum Disorders, and to serve as a catalyst for powerful interdisciplinary collaborations to tackle the global autism crisis.  Continue reading